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Lover of all things Art, Culture and Heritage. Museum Buff. Avid Traveller. Trivia Seeker. Etymologist. Former Marketer. Like to wander and wonder.

As ‘Deepfakes’ have become easier and less expensive to create, they have received a lot of attention in recent years. While they started out controversially because of their vulnerability for misuse, they have also shown immense potential for applications that can transform a wide range of experiences. In this article, we take a closer look at a couple of promising examples from the museum space, and explore how cultural institutions can use this technology to create innovative, interactive and authentic experiences.

The word ‘Deepfake’ owes its origin to a combination of “deep learning” and fake. It refers to hyper-realistic visual…


The way that the next generation is experiencing art is changing, and the pandemic only promises to catalyse that transformation. We take a closer look at the imminent Superblue launch in Miami in that context and review its critical success factors.

Es Devlin, Forest of Us, 2021. Installation view of Every Wall is a Door, Superblue Miami, 2021. Photo: Andrea Mora

In what could turn out to be a turning point for the art world, Superblue is slated to open its first Experiential Art Centre in Miami this spring after original plans to open last December were delayed by the pandemic. It positions itself as a venue showcasing immersive installations by a diverse set of interdisciplinary artists. Superblue has been…


In this post, we will explore ideas and possibilities to explore for cultural diplomacy taking India and Italy as a case study, with the aim of building of long-term relationships between the two countries.

Fragments of the ‘Colossus of Constantine’ Statue now at the Capitoline Museum, Rome (Credits: Anindya Sen)

While India’s connections in Europe have been stronger with the UK due to the colonial connections, Italy has more recently tilted towards China for economic considerations. However, it is in mutual interest for both to reach out to each other in a post-Brexit post-Pandemic world. First, it is important for both not to merely think of culture as a transactional ‘soft power’ tool. Rather, it needs…


How technology can help take art and culture closer to people, and help reinvigorate museums in the process.

Image: Mona Lisa VR Experience at the Louvre (© Musee du Louvre)

In the last decade, the larger museums in Europe focused solely on the growing stream of international tourists. They were always busy planning the next big blockbuster exhibitions, building extensions to their edifices, offering swanky new restaurants or setting up additional shops selling souvenirs. Undoubtedly, the focus on physical infrastructure was all aimed at garnering a greater share of the tourist spends. Investments in technology was largely limited to digitisation for archival of the collection. Visitor driven applications usually meant the basic…


Image: Surpris! (1891), Henri Rousseau, National Gallery, London. Credits: Anindya Sen

In an an art world trying to wager their bets between the snooty academic salon and the upstart impressionists, Henri Rousseau was ostensibly a ‘naive’ aberration. He was not an artist by training or profession, and his style neither mirrored or countered the mood or movement of his times. He was a customs officer at work (hence his nickname the ‘Douanier’) and he was largely self-taught. Mapped to the time period, he is now considered a Post-Impressionist, and in a further effort to align him stylistically he is labelled Primitivist a la Gauguin. …


Image: The Raphael Cartoons at the V&A on loan from the Royal Collection (Credits: Anindya Sen)

The modern meaning of the word ‘Cartoon’ of course is a humorous illustration that has been published in print, which owes its origin to appropriation by the British magazine Punch for its wildly popular political satire in the 1840s. But on a visit to the V&A in London some time back, as I stood mesmerised by the ‘Raphael Cartoons’, I discovered that the etymology of the word is actually rooted in fine art. …


Il Dubbio (The Doubt), Giacomo Balla (1907–08), Oil on Paper, Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Rome. Image Credit: Anindya Sen

Giacomo Balla had a long life and artistic career, but his definitive period belonged to a time when art movements were sprouting in every corner of Europe. In the first decade of the twentieth century, Cubism and Fauvism had taken Paris by storm. Artists across Europe were forming collectives, writing disruptive manifestos and launching movements of their own. In 1909 a charismatic Italian poet named Fillippo Marinetti wrote the Futurist Manifesto and bandied a group of followers which included artists like Umberto Boccioni and Carlo Carrà. The group disowned the decadent life that had come to symbolise the Victorian age…

Anindya Sen

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